How Aliens View Us!

To extraterrestrials, who comprise the vast majority of intelligent life in this universe, you are an alien. Humans are but one kind in a huge catalogue of others. Some alien populations may have compiled catalogues of millions of intelligent species, conceivably more. If and when aliens begin (or began) to electronically/electrogravitically copy other aliens’ catalogues of the sort, the number of entries could increase exponentially.

Depending on the nature of the overlap between galaxies, there could easily be catalogues of trillions of species, or more. In more advanced circles, there could be a shared kind of Universal Report, a complex news briefing that spans incredible distances and puts our national broadcasts to shame. Rather than dwell upon the affairs of one’s own small planet, such aliens could check on the science and doings of other systems, ranging freely and diversely.

Aliens have specifically stated that faster-than-light communications are a given among more advanced societies. Nearly instantaneous capacities may be possible, as one native group of Milky Way aliens reported, once electrogravity towers have been installed and correlated to form a widespread network. Towers use the iron core of a planet as a capacitor, which stores up and releases charge (or electrogravity) without need for wires. There may also be non-tower alternatives. *Thus far, no aliens have reported the ability to “physically” travel great distances, i.e. hundreds of light years, instantaneously.

The fastest published report on the subject was logged by Los Angeles Times journalist Phillip Krapf, who says that the Verdants, a group of aliens with whom he has interacted, can travel at a rate that is one million times the speed of light, using what they call “flicker drive” (a kind of electrogravity, apparently). Readers may be encouraged to note that the aliens Krapf describes say that they’re only 229 million years more advanced, technologically, than are humans. Older, more advanced alien populations may be much more capable.

Although, for fairly obvious reasons, most of the aliens reportedly catalogued by human authorities stand upright and walk on two feet, some look very different than a human. Brain appears to have triumphed over brawn—in every case. Cranial capacity has been expanded and body mass reduced, for ecological reasons. So, generally speaking, technologically advanced aliens will likely have large heads and relatively efficient bodies. Such appearances, along with different skin colors and body heights can be startling to a human, at least initially.

On larger planets with heavy gravity, stocky bodies may endure, i.e. Stefan Denaerde’s remarkable report about Iarga—just 10 light years from Earth.

It helps to remember that we probably look as weird to them as they do to us—with one minor exception. When they visit here, they clearly know that our kind exists. They’ve studied humans and human history. We’re an open book, as far as they’re concerned. Most of our data, all of our books going to press and all of our electronic communications can be lifted, using electrogravity, and recorded. Think in terms of Moore’s law (new computers double their capacity every 18-24 months).

By now, aliens are able to store the sum total of human electronic data, then file and correlate it compactly.

As other authors have suggested, we should be careful not to generalize about all aliens. There is great diversity among off-world life forms. Some may be notably more advanced than others, yet humans (and aliens) must forever be studied and vigilant in their assessment of any given world, or combination of worlds. Aliens, too, can make mistakes.

As one might expect, time and time again, aliens have proven vulnerable to psychological error. They make very human-seeming errors. Some humans will be disappointed to learn about certain off-world regimes that control their populations through fear and other, subtler kinds of intimidation. In some cases, rather than being corrected over time, specious impulses have been cultivated, if not institutionalized within a limited number of overgrown alien populations—one of which (Verdants—from another galaxy) literally describes itself as “colonizers.”

However, in each case of the sort, finer-minded independent civilizations grow up in surrounding systems and offer a critique of such offenders. Clearly, humans can choose to emulate a better strategy.

It helps to remember that, in some multi-galactic neighborhoods, there may be a kind of bully, a population that’s both feared and organized against—due to the given population’s excesses. Some populations of the sort may have developed in relative isolation or amid a heated galactic competition, a competition that, in the bully’s case, results in a repressive bureaucracy—for defensive reasons.

Sadly, to say, some such bureaucracies have reportedly lingered, long after the perceived external threat abated. According to various aliens’ reports, the end result can be a subtly disguised bias against other species, a presumption of superiority; an epic kind of wastefulness.

What begins as a defensive mobilization ends up as a self-serving apparatus intended to boost the given population’s lifestyle above and beyond that of all local competitors. 

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